Patient care Patient examinations CT-scan with drinking water and an IV with contrast solution

What is a CT scan?

A CT scan uses X-rays to produce cross-sectional images of the body, which can be used to examine a specific body part.

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About the examination

Checklist for IV contrast solution to be completed three weeks before your appointment

Before the contrast dye can be administered, we ask that you print out and complete this checklist at home. read more

Checklist for IV contrast solution to be completed three weeks before your appointment

MijnRadboud

Before the contrast solution can be administered, we kindly ask that you print out and complete this contrast checklist at home. You can do this via MijnRadboud or by using the activation code in your appointment letter.
Please complete this checklist three weeks before your appointment. This will give us enough time to make any changes that may be necessary. Once you have completed the checklist via MijnRadboud or by using the activation code, we will contact you if we need more information.
More information about MijnRadboud.

Activation code

If you received an activation code in your appointment letter, you will have to activate it before it expires. For help, watch this instructional video (YouTube). You can activate the code via MijnRadboud. This site also contains more information about the activation code.

Direct login

To log in to MijnRadboud with your username and password, click here.
To return to MijnRadboud, click on the image of the head at the top right corner of every page.

If you are unable to complete the checklist online, you can submit a paper version instead.

Before the contrast solution can be administered, we ask that you print out and complete this contrast checklist at home. If you don't have a printer, read through the questions anyway. You may have to call us before the procedure or we may recommend having someone else drive you home afterwards.
Go to the contrast checklist (checklist in Dutch).
 

Preparation

Preparations for the CT scan start the day before the procedure is scheduled to take place. Find out which clothes you should wear, what to do if you are pregnant or breastfeeding, what to do if you take medication or have a stoma, and the preparations you can expect in the waiting room. read more

Preparation

Preparations for the CT scan start the day before the procedure is scheduled to take place.

IV drip

As part of the procedure, you will be given an iodinated contrast solution intravenously (IV), which will later be flushed out by the kidneys. Kidney damage is a rare side effect of this contrast solution. The risk of kidney damage is more common in patients with reduced kidney function and in people who do not drink enough water. Drinking well before and after the procedure will help to prevent kidney damage caused by this contrast solution.
Try to drink approximately two litres of water a day and make sure you consume enough salt (you can drink an extra cup of broth, if necessary). Do this the day before the procedure and in the 24 hours after the procedure. On the day of the CT scan, we will give you water to drink in the waiting room (see heading In the waiting room below).
If you are on a fluid restriction diet, you can drink less. This diet is more important for your health than drinking is for the procedure.
If you experience any health issues before the procedure that causes you to lose a lot of fluid (e.g. severe diarrhoea, vomiting, or high fever), contact your attending physician or the Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine. 

Before the contrast solution can be administered, we kindly ask that you print out and complete this checklist (document in Dutch) at home. If you don't have a printer, read through the questions anyway. You may have to call us before the procedure, or we may recommend having someone else drive you home afterwards.

Allergic to ionidated contrast solution

If you are allergic to iodinated contrast solution, the procedure may take one hour longer and you may not be able to drive for 24 hours. Click here for more information about these precautions (in Dutch). 

Clothing

It is more convenient for you and for us if you wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothing that is easy to slip on and off. Depending on the type of procedure, you may be asked to remove garments that contain metal. 

Eating and drinking

You are not allowed to eat or drink one hour before the procedure (you may continue to take your medication as usual). We recommend having a light breakfast or lunch on the day of the CT scan.

Medication

Your attending physician may ask you to temporarily discontinue the use of certain medications. In most cases, however, you can continue taking your medication as usual. We do ask that you bring an up-to-date medical passport with you, which you can request for free from your pharmacy. 

Pregnant/breastfeeding

If you are pregnant or if you think you may be pregnant, please contact your attending physician. We will decide, in consultation with you and the radiologist, whether the procedure can be carried out as scheduled or whether it should be postponed or replaced with an alternative procedure.
If you are breastfeeding, you can continue to breastfeed your baby after the contrast solution is administered.

Disability

If you think you may need extra time and/or attention during the procedure due to a disability, please let us know in advance. We will take this into consideration as much as possible. 

Stoma

If you have a stoma, we recommend taking an extra stoma with you. If you have an ileostomy, please notify the employee who brings you your water. In this case, you will be given less to drink.

‚ÄčIn the waiting room

The first part of the procedure starts in the waiting room, where you will be asked to drink between 500 ml and 1 litre of water. In some cases, you may be given a contrast solution to drink instead. You will have thirty to forty-five minutes to drink the water or contrast solution. If you are on a fluid restriction diet, please notify the employee who brings you your water. In this case, you can drink what your diet allows.
You will then be picked up for the second part of the procedure: inserting the IV and administering the CT scan. This will take twenty minutes. The entire procedure will take approximately one hour. 


What does the procedure entail?

We may ask you to remove items of clothing. We will give you water to drink in the waiting room and we will insert an IV. read more

What does the procedure entail?

After you've finished your water in the waiting room, we will pick you up for the second part of the procedure. (In some cases, you may be given a contrast solution to drink instead of water.) We may ask you to remove items of clothing so that no metal is visible in the image. The procedure requires a contrast solution to be administered by an IV. Once the IV has been inserted, you will be slid into the ‘ring’ of the CT scanner on the examination table. This tunnel is 70 cm in diameter and 50 cm deep and is where the images are taken. We will ask you to hold your breath several times.

The entire procedure takes roughly an hour, from the time you enter the waiting room until the CT images are taken.

After the procedure

If an IV was inserted, we will remove it and you can leave the unit. We will arrange transport if you were admitted to the hospital or if you need an ambulance. read more

After the procedure

We will remove the IV and then you can leave the unit. We will arrange transport if you were admitted to the hospital or if you need an ambulance. You can ask your attending physician for a taxi statement. 
It's important to drink enough water in the 24 hours after the procedure to help your kidneys flush out the contrast solution you were administered via IV.

If you were given water to drink, you probably won't experience loose stools.
If you were given a contrast solution to drink, you may experience loose stools for one or two days. 

Results

The radiologist who performed the CT scan and/or assessed the images will submit his or her report to your attending physician as soon as possible. Your attending physician will contact you to discuss the results.

Radiology report or treatment in MijnRadboud

You can review your radiology report (without images) in MijnRadboud. read more

Radiology report or treatment in MijnRadboud

When the procedure or treatment is finished, the radiologist will assess the images. Sometimes this happens the same day, sometimes a few days later. He or she will write a report and send it to your attending physician, who will read it carefully. Your physician will use the report and any other relevant examinations to reach a conclusion. You can review your radiology report (without images) in MijnRadboud. The report will be available seven days after the radiologist submits it. In MijnRadboud, click on the tab ‘MijnDossier’ (My File) and then on ‘Uitslagen’ (Results) to see your report. Your physician will discuss the results of this report with you during your next appointment.

As there may be some time between carrying out the procedure and drafting the report, we cannot guarantee that the results will be available in MijnRadboud seven days after your procedure. It takes seven days plus the time the radiologist needs to draft the report. 

Scientific study

If your procedure is being carried out as part of a scientific study, the results will not be published in MijnRadboud.

If the contrast solution leaks out of the vein

There is a very small chance (less than 0.5%) of the contrast fluid leaking out of the vein. read more

More information


How to make or cancel an appointment

Your attending physician will request your treatment and you will receive a notification. read more

How to make or cancel an appointment

Your attending physician will contact us to request a procedure or treatment. We will send you a notification.
If your procedure or treatment is scheduled to take place within the next fifteen weeks, we will notify you as soon as possible.
If you and your attending physician have agreed that the procedure will take place in a few months, you will be notified approximately fifteen weeks in advance (no sooner).

It's important to be on time; if you're late, the appointment may be cancelled. If you are unable to make the appointment, please contact us as soon as possible. You can call the Department of Radiology during office hours from 8.30 am to 5 pm on (024) 361 45 25. If possible, we will schedule a new appointment immediately.

Getting there

Entrance: Radboudumc main entrance (hoofdingang)
Route: 780

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Getting there

Visiting address

Radboudumc main entrance
Geert Grooteplein Zuid 10
6525 GA Nijmegen

Directions

Go to Geert Grooteplein Zuid 10
Enter building at: Radboudumc main entrance (hoofdingang)
Follow route 780