People Ingrid van der Geest Navigation bone tumor

Navigation bone tumor

This research group uses the cone-beam CT scanner to acquire intraoperative 3D scans of difficult orthopedic oncological cases, and operate under navigation guidance.

Research group leader

Ingrid van der Geest PhD

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Aims of this research group

The overall goal of orthopedic oncological surgery within MITeC is better tumor control and healthy tissue preservation. Standard 2D fluoroscopy provides poor visualization of tumors in complexly shaped bones (such as the pelvis) and the end of long bones.

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Aims of this research group

The overall goal of orthopedic oncological surgery within MITeC is better tumor control and healthy tissue preservation. Standard 2D fluoroscopy provides poor visualization of tumors in complexly shaped bones (such as the pelvis) and the end of long bones. For these cases, we aim to improve tumor control and healthy tissue preservation by operating within MITeC.

We can acquire 3D scans using the intraoperative cone-beam CT, and track the position of surgical instruments within these scans using navigation. Both difficult benign and malignant bone tumor cases may benefit from this technology.

Our first goal was to set up a workflow for benign bone tumor surgery, and assess the feasibility of cone-beam CT navigation for these cases. We have since expanded its application to the more extensive surgery on malignant bone tumors.

Discoveries of this research group

Indications for cone-beam CT navigation for benign bone tumor surgery were:

  • closeness to vital structures
  • complexly shaped tumors or bone
  • minimal invasive surgery
  • repeated surgery
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Discoveries of this research group

Indications for cone-beam CT navigation for benign bone tumor surgery were:
  • closeness to vital structures (e.g. epiphysis, joint cartilage, spinal cord)
  • complexly shaped tumors or bone
  • minimal invasive surgery
  • repeated surgery
 Setting up cone-beam CT navigation takes time. The median scan time was 5 minutes, and the median time to verify the navigation system was 3 minutes. We found this acceptable given the benefits of navigation.
 

Press release

Ruim 5 miljoen euro voor kankeronderzoek in Nijmegen read more (in Dutch)

Research within MITeC

The MITeC facilities used by our research group are the cone-beam CT scanner and the surgical navigation system. A CT scan is required in order to set up navigation, because CT can be registered to the patient.

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Research within MITeC

The MITeC facilities used by our research group are the cone-beam CT scanner and the surgical navigation system. A CT scan is required in order to set up navigation, because CT can be registered to the patient. An MRI with viable information can then be fused with the CT scan in order to be used during navigation. Most of the bone tumor patients however do not have a CT scan available, so one has to be made either preoperatively or intraoperatively. We chose to use the intraoperative cone-beam CT scanner to set up navigation for patients where we expect a health benefit. The scanner is integrated with the MITeC navigation system, so we can start navigation almost immediately.
 

MITeC Connected operating rooms, for advancing innovation in patient care

MITeC offers unique consulting services and expertise to incorporate newly developed medical technology innovations and accelerate their success rate.

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Radboud Institute for Health Sciences

Ideally, every procedure in clinical practice and public health should take place based on proof, instead of intuition or 'experience'. Our aim is to innovate and personalize healthcare and public health. read more