People Richarda de Voer Cancer genomics

Discovery of novel genetic variants investigation of the molecular pathways

This research group focuses on the discovery of novel genetic variants that predispose to cancer and the investigation of the molecular pathways via which these variants initiate carcinogenesis.

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Discovery of novel genetic variants investigation of the molecular pathways

Our research group is intrigued by the fact that some of us are genetically predisposed to develop cancer at an (very) early age in life and that others are not. Our research focuses on the discovery of novel genetic variants that predispose to cancer and the investigation of the molecular pathways via which these variants initiate carcinogenesis. We use genomic technologies and functional approaches to understand cancer predisposition.

Research group leader

Richarda de Voer PhD

+31 (0)24 361 41 07
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Aims

Our research group has several aims.

  • In this KWF-fellowship, we investigate the role of the spindle assembly checkpoint in cancer predisposition in more detail.

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    The role of chromosome missegregation in (colorectal) cancer predisposition

    We previously identified mutations in the spindle assembly checkpoint in patients who developed colorectal cancer (CRC) at a young age. In this KWF-fellowship, we investigate the role of the spindle assembly checkpoint in cancer predisposition in more detail.

  • Unraveling the genetic background of colorectal cancer in adolescents and young adults

    Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with CRC represent a clinical entity distinct from elderly CRC patients, with many mucinous and poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas and advanced-stage tumors, resulting in a worse prognosis. In this project we aim to understand the molecular etiology and pathogenesis of CRC in AYAs.

  • Base excision repair defects: novel causes of adenomatous polyposis and CRC

    Individuals with multiple adenomatous polyps in the colorectum are at an increased risk of developing CRC. Two components of the base-excision repair (BER) pathways are involved in the predisposition to polyposis and CRC. This project aims to unravel the clinical and genetic implications of BER gene mutations in adenomatous polyposis and CRC.

Team

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