People Roland Kuiper

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Roland Kuiper PhD

+31 (0)24 361 41 07
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Roland Kuiper assistant professor

Roland Kuiper is a molecular biologist with a research focus on cancer genomics.

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Roland Kuiper assistant professor

Roland Kuiper is a molecular biologist with a research focus on cancer genomics. Aim of his research is to identify and characterize novel genomic abnormalities in relation to cancer risk and development, with a particular focus on hereditary (gastrointestinal) cancer and childhood leukemia. Current projects involve the identification of novel cancer predisposing genes and (epi)genetic mechanisms in families with a high, but unexplained, risk of gastric and colorectal cancer and in patients with malformation syndromes and cancer. Previous findings include the discovery of a new epigenetic silencing mechanism in hereditary colorectal cancer. In 2009, he was awarded with a ZONMW VIDI grant on heritable epimutations in colorectal cancer predisposition. Another project focuses on the characterization of recurrent genomic abnormalities (copy number alterations, acquired uniparental disomy, somatic mutations) involved in initiation and progression of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children, particularly in relation to relapse, therapy resistance and overall outcome. Recently, the IKZF1 gene was identified as a novel prognostic biomarker in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, which is currently being implemented in routine diagnostics.
 

Field of study

Human Genetics

Cancer Genomics research group

The aim of our research is to identify and characterize novel genomic abnormalities in relation to cancer risk and development, with a particular focus on hereditary (gastrointestinal) cancer and childhood leukemia.

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Cancer Genomics research group

Genomic abnormalities are a hallmark of all cancer cells and a comprehensive knowledge of the cancer genome will contribute to our understanding of many aspects of cancer, including tumour initiation and progression, prognosis, and therapy response. Aim of our research is to identify and characterize novel genomic abnormalities in relation to cancer risk and development, with a particular focus on hereditary (gastrointestinal) cancer and childhood leukemia.

Subtheme 1) The genetic origin of hereditary cancer

Within this subtheme we aim to identify novel cancer predisposing genes and genetic mechanisms in families with a high, but unexplained, risk of gastric and colorectal cancer and in patients with malformation syndromes and cancer.
In addition, we aim at resolving the biological and clinical significance of these genes, including the role of recently identified EPCAM deletions in the epigenetic silencing of the MSH2 gene in Lynch syndrome.
This research is performed in close collaboration with the Hereditary Cancer Clinic at the division of Clinical Genetics (prof. dr. N. Hoogerbrugge) and the Laboratory of Tumor Genetics (dr. M. Ligtenberg) within our department.

Subtheme 2) Genomic analysis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)

The aim is to identify and characterize recurrent genomic abnormalities (copy number alterations, acquired uniparental disomy, somatic mutations) involved in initiation and progression of ALL in children, particularly in relation to relapse, therapy resistance and overall outcome. Within this subtheme we closely collaborate with dr. Frank van Leeuwen and prof. Dr. Peter Hoogerbrugge (department of Pediatric Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center).

Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences

Our main aim is to achieve a greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms of disease. By integrating fundamental and clinical research, we obtain multifaceted knowledge of (patho)physiological processes. read more