10 August 2017

Sita Vermeulen (Health Evidence) has been awarded an NWO Vidi grant of 800 K€ for the project “Personalizing BCG immunotherapy in bladder cancer: a novel approach using germline and acquired DNA variants”.

A good therapy choice in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer requires a test that can predict who will and who will not respond to BCG immunotherapy. Vermeulen’s research measures DNA variants in the genes of the patient and the bladder tumor and selected immune parameters to facilitate the development of such a test.

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