9 July 2020

At the beginning of a new academic year, we also start a new series of Research Integrity Rounds, the interactive events organized at the Radboudumc to stimulate dialogue and debate about matters of research integrity. All members of the academic community, from student to PhD candidate to professor, are invited to join this exchange again.
 
Are sex and gender a matter of research practice or of representation policy? And what do they have to do with research integrity? We will discuss this during the first Research Integrity Round of 2020-2021 on the topic sex and gender in (bio)medical research.
 
Program
  • Opening by prof. Jan Smit, dean and vice-chair Radboudumc
  • The biomedical research process: is it really gender and sex neutral? Prof. Sabine Oertelt-Prigione (Radboudumc)
Whoever thought that (bio)medical science is always neutral and that sex and gender do not matter to its research process and results will be awakened from that dream by Sabine Oertelt-Prigione. She will show that sex differences affect the incidence of diseases and response to therapy through a variety of distinct mechanisms ranging from transcription differences to hormonal influences. Being a female, male or intersex subject can significantly impact the body´s physiology and, hence, results of our experiments. In addition, gender norms and relations can impact our health seeking behavior, the care we obtain and the long-term consequences of illness. Since gender roles are dynamic and changing over time, their investigation is complex and methodological questions are a matter of active research and discussion. Can we continue to negate these influences if we strive for science with quality and integrity?
  • The practice of biomedical process: are some still more equal than others? Prof. Hanneke Takkenberg (Erasmus University)
Of course, biomedical science does not only involve sex and gender sensitive research processes, it is also a practice of researchers who compete and collaborate with each other. Hanneke Takkenberg will discuss how gender shapes the career options of individuals working in the biomedical field. Although the number of women graduates is steadily increasing, representation in biomedical leadership is lagging behind. The causes for this discrepancy can be found at many levels, from non-representative role models, to systemic hurdles, to experiences of overt discrimination and harassment. What is the lived reality of women and minorities in the biomedical field today and what can be actively done to change the status quo? Could we ever claim to aim for academic integrity, if we continued to allow gender inequalities at the university?
 
Time and location
Wednesday 16 September 16:00 – 17:30 hrs
Due to Corona-restrictions the meeting will be a webinar. Information about how to login will be given after you have registered.
 
Registration
Registration is required. Please register via www.radboudumc.nl/researchintegrityrounds.
 
Target group
We invite all master students and junior and senior researchers to attend this event and join the discussion.
 
Please note that PhD candidates can add the Research Integrity Rounds to their Training and Supervision Plan.
 
 

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