Trials Nijmegen Biomedical Study

A reference population for research into genetic variation, lifestyle and environmental exposures in relation to traits and diseases

In the year 2000 a large study was initiated among the inhabitans of the municipality of Nijmegen by several departments of the Radboud university medical center (at that time the departments Epidemiology, Biostatistics and HTA, Clinical Chemistry, and endocrinology, at the time part of the Radboud University Nijmegen Mediacal Centre) and in collaboration with the municipality of Nijmegen and the community health service of Nijmegen.

The central research question was: "What is the prevalence of certain risk factors, chronic diseases and genetic variations in the general population?". The goal of the sudy was to obtain a universal reference population that can be efficiently used in a variety of medical studies.

In the meantime, the observational study has been closed. On this page you can read the latest developments.

Researcher


About NBS

The NBS consists of a number of phases. In first instance, people only received a limited questionnaire and an invitation to donate a blood sample (NBS1). In following phases, they received an invitation for an extensive examination and additional questionnaires (NBS2-5).

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About NBS

The NBS was initiated by the Department for Health Evidence, the Department of Laboratory Medicine and the Department of Internal Medicine of the Radboud university medical center (RUMC). The Department of Human Genetics of the RUMC has joined the NBS project team in a later stage. Also, the municipality Nijmegen and the community health service Nijmegen were involved as collaborators in NBS1. The NBS is financed by the departments and agencies mentioned above and a grant from the so called ‘Vrije Beleidsruimte’ of the RUMC.

The NBS consists of a number of phases. Because too extensive measurements have a negative impact on participant response, we chose a phased model in which people in first instance only received a limited questionnaire and an invitation to donate a blood sample (NBS1). In following phases, they received an invitation for an extensive examination and additional questionnaires (NBS2-5). In phase 2-5 we joined forces with other departments within RUMC and the department of Human Nutrition of Wageningen University and Research Centre that were interested in specific data.

More information? Read the detailed description of the NBS in the cohort profile.


  • In collaboration with the municipality of Nijmegen and the community health service Nijmegen the first phase of the NBS was conducted between 2001 and 2003. First, the logistic set-up of the NBS1 was tested in a pilot study that was performed between November 2001 and February 2002. A random sample of names and addresses of 650 males and females of 18 years and older was obtained via the registers of the municipality Nijmegen. All have received a questionnaire (QN) with questions related to lifestyle, health, disease, and medication use; 342 QNS were filled out (response 53%). Of those people that have returned a completed questionnaire, 262 (77%) have also donated a sample of blood. The procedure of blood sampling was slightly altered after the pilot study; the number of options with regard to time of donation were increased and the number of places for blood donation were decreased.

    Then, a random sample from the register of the population of Nijmegen, stratified on sex and 5-year age groups, was taken on July 1 2002. All men and women over 18 years, not living in institutions and rest homes, and able to fill out a Dutch questionnaire, were eligible. In total 22,451 inhabitants of  the municipality of Nijmegen received an invitation to fill out a postal questionnaire on, e.g., lifestyle and medical history, and to donate an 8.5 ml blood sample in a serum separator tube and a 10 ml EDTA blood sample. 96% was of Dutch nationality and 79% was born in the Netherlands.

    The age distribution is depicted in Table 1.

    Age group

    Number (%)

    18 – 29 years

    3370 (15.0%)

    30 – 39 years

    3438 (15.3%)

    40 – 49 years

    3242 (14.4%)

    50 – 59 years

    3196 (14.2%)

    60 – 69 years

    3203 (14.3%)

    70 – 79 years

    3072 (13.7%)

    ≥ 80 years

    2930 (13.1%)

    Total

    22451

    Table 1: Age distribution age and sex stratified sample, July 1 2002


    The response to the questionnaire was 42% (N=9350). 69% (N=6468) of the responders donated blood samples (see Figure 1). For detailed information on the questions included in the NBS1 questionnaire see section ‘Researcher data'. The serum and plasma samples have been stored in the Radboud Biobank. A number of measurements have been performed in these samples and DNA has been isolated.


    Figure 1: Response to questionnaire (QN) and blood donation.


Organization

The NBS is initiated by several departments of the RUMC in collaboration with the municipality Nijmegen and the community health service of the region Nijmegen. The Department for Health Evidence is coordinating the study.

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Organization

The NBS is initiated by several departments of the RUMC in collaboration with the municipality Nijmegen and the community health service of the region Nijmegen. The Department for Health Evidence is coordinating the study.

Project management

Prof. L.A. Kiemeney PhD, Health Evidence / Urology
Prof. A.L. Verbeek PhD, Health Evidence
Prof. D.W. Swinkels PhD, Laboratory medicine
Prof. B. Franke PhD, Genetics

Coordinators

T.E. Galesloot PhD, Health Evidence (09/2012 - heden)
S.H. Vermeulen PhD, Health Evidence / Antropogenetics (01/2009 - 09/2012)
M. de Visser PhD, Health Evidence / Endocrine diseases (1/2011 - 8/2011)
F. de Vegt PhD, Health Evidence (10/2000 - 01/2009)
E.A. Roovers PhD, Health Evidence (01/2005 - 04/2007)

Others involved

Data manager
W. Lemmens, Health Evidence
Research assistant
U. Oldenhof, Health Evidence
Technicians
S.M. Klaver, Laboratory medicine
R.R. Makkinje, Genetics
S. van der Marel, Genetics
J. van Steenoven, Laboratory medicine
Others involed NBS1
L. Deurloo MSc, Municipality Nijmegen
K. Goderie MSc, Municipality Nijmegen
W. Vegt MSc, Municipality Nijmegen
P. Oude Vrielink PhD, Community health service Nijmegen
Participating researchers NBS2
Prof. J. de Graaf PhD, Internal medicine (mede-coördinator NBS-2 50-70 jaar)
Prof. A.F.H. Stalenhoef PhD, Internal medicine
Prof. A.R.M.M. Hermus PhD, Endocrine diseases
Prof. M.G.M. Olde Rikkert PhD, Geriatrics
P.E. Vos PhD, Neurology
Prof. J.F.M. Wetzels PhD, Kidney diseases
Prof. dr. J.K. Buitelaar PhD, Psychiatry
J.G.E. Janzing PhD, Psychiatry
Prof. J.A.M. Kremer PhD, Obstetrics & Gynecology
N. Roeleveld PhD, Health Evidence
Prof. P.L.C.M. van Riel PhD, Rheumatology
Prof. J.D. Blankensteijn PhD, Vascular surgery
Prof. P. van ’t Veer PhD, Human food, Wageningen Universiteit

NBS-data for scientific research usage

The NBS-date are, both nationally and internationally, still widely requested.

  • View the detailed description of the NBS for an overview of the collected data. Use the contact details above to request the data.

    see publication


  • Overview questionnaires

    Note: All questionnaires are in Dutch. View 'About NBS' for Over NBS' for additional explanations of the questionnaires and associated phases of the study.

Scientific publications

See related publications.

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Scientific publications

The Nijmegen Biomedical Study has resulted in a large number of scientific peer reviewed publications. Links to these publications can be found in this section.

2018

  • Bralten J, van Hulzen KJ, Martens MB, Galesloot TE, Arias Vasquez A, Kiemeney LA, et al. Autism spectrum disorders and autistic traits share genetics and biology. Molecular psychiatry. 2018;23(5):1205-12.
  • Corominas J, Klein M, Zayats T, Rivero O, Ziegler GC, Pauper M, et al. Identification of ADHD risk genes in extended pedigrees by combining linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing. Molecular psychiatry. 2018.
  • Dixon-Suen SC, Nagle CM, Thrift AP, Pharoah PDP, Ewing A, Pearce CL, et al. Adult height is associated with increased risk of ovarian cancer: a Mendelian randomisation study. British journal of cancer. 2018;118(8):1123-9.
  • Li Y, Xiao X, Han Y, Gorlova O, Qian D, Leighl N, et al. Genome-wide interaction study of smoking behavior and non-small cell lung cancer risk in Caucasian population. Carcinogenesis. 2018;39(3):336-46.
  • Liu G, Mukherjee B, Lee S, Lee AW, Wu AH, Bandera EV, et al. Robust Tests for Additive Gene-Environment Interaction in Case-Control Studies Using Gene-Environment Independence. Am J Epidemiol. 2018;187(2):366-77.
  • Marees AT, Hammerschlag AR, Bastarache L, de Kluiver H, Vorspan F, van den Brink W, et al. Exploring the role of low-frequency and rare exonic variants in alcohol and tobacco use. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2018;188:94-101.
  • Rafnar T, Sigurjonsdottir GR, Stacey SN, Halldorsson G, Sulem P, Pardo LM, et al. Association of BRCA2 K3326* With Small Cell Lung Cancer and Squamous Cell Cancer of the Skin. Journal of the National Cancer Institute. 2018.
  • Schellevis RL, van Dijk EHC, Breukink MB, Altay L, Bakker B, Koeleman BPC, et al. Role of the Complement System in Chronic Central Serous Chorioretinopathy: A Genome-Wide Association Study. JAMA Ophthalmol. 2018.
  • Turcot V, Lu Y, Highland HM, Schurmann C, Justice AE, Fine RS, et al. Protein-altering variants associated with body mass index implicate pathways that control energy intake and expenditure in obesity. Nature genetics. 2018;50(1):26-41.

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006