21 December 2017

Dietary patterns and risk of recurrence and progression in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

Alina Vrieling and Ellen Westhoff, theme Urological cancers, recently published in the International Journal of Cancer about the influence of dietary factors on urinary bladder cancer prognosis. 

The association of dietary factors with urinary bladder cancer prognosis has scarcely been investigated, and results of studies conducted to date are inconsistent. Since diet consists of many components that are correlated and can potentially interact with each other, it may be better to evaluate dietary patterns rather than single factors when estimating diet-disease associations. In collaboration with the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, we therefore investigated whether dietary patterns are associated with risks of recurrence and progression in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer patients.

In 595 patients newly diagnosed non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer in the US we identified four dietary patterns, the names reflecting the food products contributing most to the patterns: “fruits and vegetables”, “Western”, “low-fat”, and “Tex-Mex”. We found that having a more Western dietary pattern (high intake of e.g. meat and fried products) was associated with a higher risk of recurrence. No associations with risk of progression, or of the other dietary patterns with risk of recurrence and progression were found. Since this is the first study investigating dietary patterns in relation to bladder cancer prognosis, further studies are needed to confirm our findings.

Link to publication

Alina Vrieling (photo left)
Ellen Westhoff (photo right)



 

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