17 September 2020

Annette studied biotechnology at the Technical University of Berlin, Germany. In 2003 she received her PhD and an award for best thesis of the year from the University of Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg, France, for her work on the molecular basis of the Fragile X Syndrome. Her postdoctoral research, at the Max Planck Institute of Cell Biology and Genetics in Dresden, Germany, unravelled the function of a new cell organ.

Arrival at Nijmegen

In 2007 she received a Hypatia research fellowship from the Radboudumc to set up her independent line of research into the molecular, cellular and embryological basis of intellectual disability. In 2008 she received a NWO-ZonMW VIDI grant, and a year later she was an associate professor. Meanwhile, her research is embedded in several European and international consortia. In early 2020 she received a NWO-ZonMW VICI grant, the most prestigious personal career award in the Netherlands.

Research vision

In her position as professor, Schenck will bring together fundamental and translational research in the field of brain developmental disorders, including intellectual disabilities, autism and ADHD. Her work is leading the use of the fruit fly Drosophila as a very powerful and cost-effective model to better understand how early onset cognitive brain disorders occur - and how to treat them.

Annette: "Over the past few decades we have made tremendous progress in understanding the genetics of these disorders. Now we need to take this knowledge to the next level so that the people suffering from these conditions can benefit. In fruit flies, we can simultaneously explore a wide range of diseases, their interactions, medications and other therapeutic approaches, all in the context of an intact brain capable of learning, remembering and exhibiting other relevant behaviors. My ambition as a professor is to make this classical genetic model applicable as a powerful tool to help shape future health care for cognitive developmental disorders, at an individual and, where possible, broader applicable level."

Related news items


Scientists find that the impact of social media on wellbeing varies across adolescence

29 March 2022

Girls and boys might be more vulnerable to the negative effects of social media use at different times during their adolescence, say an international team of scientists in a study published today in Nature Communications.

read more

Rogier Kievit and Geert Litjens both receive ERC Starting Grant of 1.5 million euros Board of Directors congratulates researchers on top grant

13 January 2022

Researchers Rogier Kievit and Geert Litjens were today festively welcomed by the Board of Directors, because of the ERC Starting Grants they both received. With these European top grants, they can each design an ambitious research project and put together their own research group.

read more

KNAW Early Career Award for Martine Hoogman

2 December 2021

Martine Hoogman has been awarded a KNAW Early Career Award. The prize, a sum of 15,000 euros and a work of art, is aimed at researchers in the Netherlands who are at the start of their careers and have innovative, original research ideas.

read more

The Effects of Intermittent Fasting on Brain and Cognitive Function

10 November 2021

Intermittent Fasting is a type of diet in which one refrains from eating for periods of time. It is known that it has positive effects on metabolic health, but what is the effect of this diet on brain and cognition? Radboudumc researchers reviewed experimental evidence on this topic.

read more

BRAINMODEL: precision medicine for brain disorders

3 November 2021

A team of researchers is going to look for new and better ways to heal developmental disorders in the brain. Six different knowledge institutions are to collaborate with civil societies, professional associations and companies on new stem cell-based methods in a project entitled ‘BRAINMODEL’.

read more

Study shows no relation between breastfeeding and inhibitory control in three-year-old children

15 September 2021

New study from Radboudumc researchers, investigated whether breastfeeding was related to inhibitory control, the ability to control impulsive behavior, of 3-year-old children, and whether diet played an intermediate role in this relation.

read more