20 September 2018

The 2nd ENABLE symposium entitled “The promise of future medicine: from research to therapy” will be hosted in Copenhagen, from 7 - 9 November.

ENABLE is unique because world-class scientific content is combined with focus on development of “soft skills” in workshops and career chats. There will also be a job with various types of companies and foundations, ranging from publishers to consultancy. Rimls supports the attendance of our young researchers to this symposium.

Don’t miss out, registration closes 30 September. For registration and more information on this year’s event, check out: link.
 
 

Related news items


Improved AI will boost cancer research and cancer care Geert Litjens receives ERC Starting Grant

13 January 2022

Geert Litjens from Radboud university medical center has received a European Research Council (ERC) Starting Grant.

read more

Understanding fluctuation variation in cognitive abilities may provide insight into lifelong learning Rogier Kievit recieves ERC Starting Grant

13 January 2022

Rogier Kievit from Radboud university medical center has received a European Research Council (ERC) Starting Grant.

read more

Looking back on RIMLS New Year celebration and awards

12 January 2022

RIMLS organized a special online New Year Celebration, together looking back at the year 2021. René Bindels reviewed 2021 together with Clasien Oomen and Dagmar Eleveld-Trancikova, looked forward towards 2022 and presented the RIMLS awards and several other prizes.

read more

Hans Jacobs receives KWF Proof-of-Concept grant to develop personalized cancer diagnostics

11 January 2022

The Dutch Cancer Society (KWF) launched a new funding program to support successful KWF researchers to translate their results into clinical practice. Hans Jacobs and his team developed a personalized blood-test to measure minimal residual disease (MRD) in patients with multiple myeloma.

read more

ody composition is more important than BMI for renal cancer survival rates

11 January 2022

Body composition is important for survival rates in renal cell cancer. Research from the Radboudumc shows that low muscle quality and low organ fat are associated with poor survival. This involves different stages of renal cancer, ranging from stage I-III to stage IV.

read more