13 June 2019

The coming five years, partners from the Netherlands Centre for One Health, will investigate how the Netherlands can be better prepared for infectious diseases transmitted by mosquitoes.

Ronald van Rij and Pascal Miesen, theme Infectious diseases and global health, participate in this exciting project. Their team will focus on the molecular mechanisms that influence viral disease transmission by tropical mosquitoes.

Listen to the interview (12 June 2019) of Pascal Miesen on the Dutch National Radio here (7.42 - 7.46.hrs.)
Watch the interview of Pascal Miesen on the Dutch National TV here.

The Dutch Research Council (NWO) has awarded almost 9 million euros for this research. This amount has been supplemented to 10 million euros in contributions from seven collaborating public organisations. The multidisciplinary character of the collaboration, in which citizen science will play a role, is unique.

Outbreaks of (new) infectious diseases in humans and animals are becoming more prevalent worldwide. That is due to various factors, such as population growth, international trade, international travel and climate change. In the Netherlands, a relatively large number of people, livestock and animals live near each other. In combination with our water-rich landscape and busy international trade and travel, it makes us vulnerable to outbreaks of infectious diseases.

Vector-borne diseases
The team will mainly focus on vector-borne diseases: infectious diseases transmitted by insects such as mosquitoes. As a result of climate change, exotic mosquito species are becoming more common in the Netherlands. But under the right conditions, mosquito species native to the Netherlands can transmit (tropical) viruses too. The recent outbreak of the usutu virus (the “blackbird disease”) among birds demonstrates the importance of early preparedness for such diseases. That applies not only to the Netherlands but also the Dutch Caribbean and the rest of Europe.
Outbreaks can arise due to a combination of factors. Over the next five years, 25 PhD researchers will focus on four themes that influence the development of outbreaks:
  1. changes in the climate,
  2. changes in water management,
  3. changes in agricultural methods, and
  4. changes concerning international travel and import risks.
They will investigate the impact of changes in the climate, water management, agricultural methods and import risks on the probability of a vector-borne virus outbreak in the Netherlands. Through collaboration with researchers from the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), the Netherlands Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority (NVWA), and the blood banks in the Netherlands and the Dutch Caribbean, the outcomes will be translated into measures to ensure we are better prepared for a possible disease outbreak. The team of Radboudumc researchers is going to focus on the molecular mechanisms that influence viral disease transmission by tropical mosquitoes.

Citizen science
During the research, the team will collaborate with various scientific bodies and make use of research results from other projects. These will include citizen science projects: initiatives in which citizens and high school pupils are involved. For example, they will provide research data about birds, mosquitoes and water or use travel apps such as the Municipal Health Services’ “GGD reist mee” and the “ZIeKA-monitor”.

Partners
Coordination: Erasmus MC
Collaborative partners: Avans University of Applied Sciences, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden University/Naturalis, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Radboud University Medical Centre, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht University, Wageningen University & Research
Co-funding partners: Deltares, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), Red Cross Blood Bank Foundation Curacao, Sanquin, Technasium Foundation, Centre for Monitoring of Vectors (CMV)
International collaborating partner CEAB-CSIC: Centre for Advanced Studies of Blanes (CEAB) a research institute within the Superior Council of Scientific Investigations (CSIC)

More information: link.
 

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