19 December 2019

In Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology, Colin Jacobs and Bram van Ginneken discussed the recent paper by Google AI in Nature Medicine on deep learning models for automatic detection of lung cancer from computed tomography. 
 
The authors of the Nature Medicine paper report a level of performance similar to, or better than, that of radiologists. Jacobs and van Ginneken explain that these claims are currently too strong. The developed models are promising but need further validation and could only be implemented if screening guidelines were adjusted to accept recommendations from black- box proprietary AI systems.

publication 
Google's lung cancer AI: a promising tool that needs further validation.
Jacobs C, van Ginneken B.​

Colin Jacobs and Bram van Ginneken are members of theme Rare cancers.

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