News Large NWO grant for Chris de Korte

15 November 2018

NWO Domain Applied and Engineering Sciences (AES) has granted project ULTRA-X-TREME 4 million euros for developing new 3D ultrasound techniques allowing patient-specific diagnosis of vascular problems and prevention of unnecessary operations. The project is led by Chris de Korte, professor of Medical Ultrasound Techniques at Radboudumc and professor of Medical Ultrasound Imaging at the University of Twente.

Vascular problems may have life-threatening consequences. For instance, ischemic cerebrovascular accidents are often caused by carotid artery atherosclerosis, and fatal rupture of the abdominal aorta often results from vascular wall weakening. Doctors may use echography to assess the risk of vascular complications by measuring the diameter of the vessels in question. However, this method is shown to have only limited predictive value. As a result, unnecessary and risky treatments are given, whereas high-risk cases remain unidentified.  
 
New techniques
As part of the program Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for Extended Diagnosis and Treatment of Vascular Disease (ULTRA-X-TREME), an international research team is to develop new and more accurate three-dimensional vascular wall and perfusion ultrasound imaging techniques. The team has been granted four million euros by the funding instrument Perspectief of NWO Domain AES. In the next five years, under the supervision of Chris de Korte, professor of Medical Ultrasound Techniques at Radboud university medical center and professor of Medical Ultrasound Imaging at the University of Twente, the researchers will develop new ultrasound sensors, contrast agents and analysis techniques to more accurately assess the necessity of vascular treatment.   
 
Consortium
The ULTRA-X-TREME consortium is a collaboration of hospitals, international industrial partners and Dutch research groups with a focus on ultrasound techniques and vascular biomechanics. In alphabetical order, the participants in the program are: ANSYS, Bracco Suisse S.A., Catharina Hospital, Erasmus MC, Harteraad, Mindray, Dutch Society for Vascular Surgery (NVvV), Philips Electronics Netherlands, Pie Medical Imaging, Radboud university medical center, Rijnstate Hospital, Delft University of Technology, Eindhoven University of Technology, TomTec Imaging Systems, University of Twente, Vermon S.A. and Verasonics.

Chris de Korte is member of theme Vascular damage.
 

Related news items


Cum laude PhD defense Marlène Hekman

18 December 2018

Based on her excellent thesis and performance during the defense, the doctorate was awarded with the distinction 'cum laude'.

read more

Research into drugs for treating rare diseases can be more efficient and patient-oriented

18 December 2018

To assess whether a drug is an effective treatment for a rare disease, large-scale research with Randomized Controlled Trials may not be necessary in all situations, say researchers from the departments of Neurology and Health Evidence in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

read more

Christine Mohrmann stipendium for Karlien Mul

14 December 2018

The goal of the stipendium is to enable junior female scientists to perform research abroad and to encourage them to pursue a scientific career in academia.

read more

Call for nominations RIHS Awards 2017 & 2018

14 December 2018

RIHS researchers are invited to propose candidates for the RIHS PhD Award, the Societal Impact Award, the Science Award and the Supervisor of the year Award. Deadline for nominations is 14 January 2019.

read more

Bart Kiemeney among most cited researchers

13 December 2018

Bart Kiemeney made it to this year’s list of highly cited researchers. Researchers in this list are selected for their exceptional research performance and are regarded to have had a major impact on fellow scientists.

read more

Metal surgical implants can activate drugs

13 December 2018

Marja Bulte-ter Meer and Leo Schultze Kool discovered that the iron in metal surgical implants can activate drugs such as antibiotics, thus enabling targeted therapy.

read more
  • Go to