18 January 2018

Robin van der Lee received a Rubicon Grant from the Dutch Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). The Rubicon program gives young, highly promising researchers the opportunity to gain international research experience.

How changes in the DNA give rise to cancer remains largely unclear. Data from new biomedical technologies contain new knowledge. Robin van der Lee will develop bioinformatics methods to simultaneously study the DNA of thousands of cancer patients and to discover which changes result in the disease at the University of British Columbia, Canada. Robin was a former PhD candidate and postdoc at the CMBI under supervision of Martijn Huijnen.

International research experience is for many scientists an important step in their career. Thanks to the Rubicon grant young researchers can do their research at top institutes across the world for a maximum of 24 months. The size of the grant depends on the destination chosen and the length of stay. A total of 79 researchers submitted a proposal for Rubicon in this round, of which 21 were honored.

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