6 June 2019

In a study "Naturally acquired immunity against immature Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes," published in Science Translational Medicine, researchers from the group of Teun Bousema and international colleagues have revealed previously unknown targets of natural human antibody responses that are found on the surfaces of red blood cells infected with malaria parasites.

A vaccine to boost this natural response may provide an efficient way to block both disease and its spread.

Note: developing gametocytes are neutralized by human immune cells

In the University of Glasgow's 'University news', Teun Bousema indicates that “Whilst there is no single magic bullet that solves malaria, this is a very promising discovery. It helps us in understanding how malaria spreads in communities and offers an important new lead to develop novel tools. Such novel tools are critical to maintain the momentum of the ongoing malaria elimination campaign and finding new ways to end the spread of this awful disease”. 

Read more in Science Translational Medicine

Teun Bousema is member of theme Infectious disease and global health.

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