6 June 2019

In a study "Naturally acquired immunity against immature Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes," published in Science Translational Medicine, researchers from the group of Teun Bousema and international colleagues have revealed previously unknown targets of natural human antibody responses that are found on the surfaces of red blood cells infected with malaria parasites.

A vaccine to boost this natural response may provide an efficient way to block both disease and its spread.

Note: developing gametocytes are neutralized by human immune cells

In the University of Glasgow's 'University news', Teun Bousema indicates that “Whilst there is no single magic bullet that solves malaria, this is a very promising discovery. It helps us in understanding how malaria spreads in communities and offers an important new lead to develop novel tools. Such novel tools are critical to maintain the momentum of the ongoing malaria elimination campaign and finding new ways to end the spread of this awful disease”. 

Read more in Science Translational Medicine

Teun Bousema is member of theme Infectious disease and global health.

Related news items


Frank Walboomers 25-years work anniversary at Radboudumc

17 September 2020

Frank Walboomers, associate professor at the research group Regenerative Biomaterials at the Dept. of Dentistry (theme Reconstructive & Regenerative Medicine), celebrated his 25th work anniversary at Radboudumc.

read more

Tjitske Kleefstra appointed endowed professor of Clinical genetics and psychopathology of rare syndromes

17 September 2020

Tjitske Kleefstra has been appointed endowed professor of Clinical genetics and psychopathology of rare syndromes at the department of Neurodevelopmental disorders, with effect from 1 September.

read more

Annette Schenck appointed professor of Translational Genetics

17 September 2020

Annette Schenck has been appointed professor of Translational Genetics at the department of Neurodevelopmental disorders, with effect from 1 August. The chair will bring together fundamental and translational research in the field of brain developmental disorders.

read more

Centuries-old medicine reduces the risk of new cardiovascular disease in heart patients

17 September 2020

Colchicine, an anti-inflammatory drug that has been used for gout for centuries, has been shown to prevent cardiovascular disease in patients who have had a heart attack or are suffering from narrowed coronary arteries. Results of the study are published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

read more

Radboudumc does large-scale research on systemic sclerosis

10 September 2020

In rare diseases, such as systemic sclerosis, it’s often difficult to conduct large-scale research. Rheumatologist Madelon Vonk has managed to follow enough patients with systemic sclerosis for years. The results of her research have been published in BMJ Annal of the Rheumatic Diseases.

read more