17 December 2019

The Dutch Kidney Foundation supports talented postdocs and physician researchers through providing personal grants that support different phases of a research career. Kolff grant recipients are foreseen to make important contributions to the field of renal research and to stimulate the application of research results in practice.

The Kolff grants recipients are: Project title: Innate immune-regulating nanotherapy for renal transplantation

Patients undergoing kidney transplantation are treated with immunosuppressive medication mainly aimed at suppression of the adaptive immune system. These drugs are effective but come at the cost of substantial adverse side effects, such as infections, cancer, and diabetes. In his research he focuses on the development of a new type of treatment aimed at the innate immune system with the aim of preventing acute rejection. For this purpose he will use nanotechnology to deliver medication very specifically to monocytes and macrophages. This has the advantage of efficient delivery of drugs specifically to these cells, while the total amount of medication that enters the body can be minimized, reducing potential side effects. Project title: PRednisOne effectS on Podocytes; rEsolving the moleculaR enigma - The PROSPER study.

Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is characterized by massive proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia and edema, as a result of extensive podocyte foot process effacement. The mainstay of therapy for NS patients is prednisone. NS management is as yet unpredictable, mainly because the molecular mechanisms underlying NS and prednisone treatment are poorly understood. Moreover, prednisone treatment is associated with severe adverse effects. Hence, there is an urgent need to develop more specific therapies to treat NS with less side effects. The aim of her study is to resolve molecular targets regulated by prednisone that are essential for successful podocyte recovery. These results will be instrumental for the development of more specific therapeutic entities to treat NS with less side effects.
 

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