21 January 2019

Martijn Huijnen, theme Mitochondrial diseases, and colleagues developed COmplexome Profiling ALignment (COPAL) to systematically asses the effect of Barth syndome on mitochondrial protein complexes.

They published their findings in Bioinformatics.

Complexome profiling combines native gel electrophoresis with mass spectrometry to obtain the inventory, composition and abundance of multiprotein assemblies in an organelle. Applying complexome profiling to determine the effect of a mutation on protein complexes requires separating technical and biological variations from the variations caused by that mutation.

They have developed the COmplexome Profiling ALignment (COPAL) tool that aligns multiple complexome profiles with each other. It includes the abundance profiles of all proteins on two gels, using a multidimensional implementation of the dynamic time warping algorithm to align the gels. Subsequent progressive alignment allows them to align multiple profiles with each other. They tested COPAL on complexome profiles from control mitochondria and from Barth syndrome (BTHS) mitochondria, which have a mutation in tafazzin gene that is involved in remodelling the inner mitochondrial membrane phospholipid cardiolipin. By comparing the variation between BTHS mitochondria and controls with the variation among either, they assessed the effects of BTHS on the abundance profiles of individual proteins. Combining those profiles with gene set enrichment analysis allows detecting significantly affected protein complexes. Most of the significantly affected protein complexes are located in the inner mitochondrial membrane (MICOS, prohibitins), or are attached to it (the large ribosomal subunit).

Related news items


The first Radboud Nanomedicine community networking event

14 February 2019

On 7 February 2019 the first Radboud Nanomedicine community networking event took place. The goal of the event was to bring together all those working in the field of nanomedicine at the Radboud University and Radboudumc, irrespective of the theme in which the research is performed.

read more

Research Integrity Round: The ConScience App 15 February 2019

14 February 2019

To introduce the new Netherlands Code of Conduct for Research Integrity we invited ‘Het Acteursgenootschap’ to perform ‘The ConScience App’, a theatre piece designed to move the debate on scientific knowledge. All Radboudumc researchers are invited to attend this event.

read more

Gene involved in colorectal cancer also causes breast cancer

14 February 2019

Judith Grolleman, Nicoline Hoogerbrugge and Richarda de Voer, theme Tumors of the digestive tract, published in Cancer Cell that mutations in the NTHL1 gene, previously associated with colorectal cancer, also cause breast cancer and other types of cancer.

read more

Endometrial natural killer cells remember previous pregnancy

11 February 2019

Dorien Feyaerts, theme Inflammatory diseases, showed that pregnancy induces a memory phenotype on endometrial natural killer cells. However, previous CMV infection is a prerequisite for this memory induction. They published their findings in Cellular and Molecular Immunology.

read more

A personal touch of Iris Nagtegaal

10 February 2019

In order to promote interaction amongst colleagues within RIMLS, we have a ‘personal touch’ series setting employees in the spotlight. A light-hearted manner to learn about the colleagues you know and those you don’t! This week: Iris Nagtegaal.

read more

ZonMw TOP grant to uncover the dormancy of malaria parasites

7 February 2019

Richard Bartfai, theme Infectious diseases and global health, and Clemens Kocken (BPRC) received 675,000 euros from ZonMw to uncover the molecular mechanisms underlying dormancy of malaria parasites, a major obstacle to efficient treatment of P. vivax malaria.

read more