23 April 2020

Effective 1 April 2020, Martin Boeree has been appointed professor of Clinical Tuberculosis and other Mycobacterial Diseases at Radboud University/Radboudumc. He is the first professor in this field in the Netherlands.

Martin Boeree is searching for shorter and better treatments for drug sensitive and resistant tuberculosis. He is also conducting interdisciplinary research on treatment and clinical relevance in the area of non-tuberculous mycobacteria: bacteria that are related to tuberculosis that cause infections other than tuberculosis. These types of infections are becoming increasingly common in the Netherlands. Martin Boeree heads the Centre of Expertise for Mycobacterial Diseases.

On Martin Boeree
Martin Boeree (1958, Eelde) studied Medicine at the University of Groningen, and followed specialist training in the Lichtenberg Hospital in Amersfoort and the Academic Hospital Groningen, where he was registered as a pulmonologist in 1994. He also completed the study  Tropical Medicine and International Health at the KIT Royal Tropical Institute in Amsterdam, where he was registered as a tropical medicine specialist in 1994. In 2003, he completed his PhD with a study on tuberculosis control in Africa during the peak of the HIV epidemic.

In 1995, Boeree left to spend five years in Malawi. He worked as a specialist in the Internal Medicine department of the medical faculty in Blantyre, and he became head of the department in 1997.
After working in the Twenteborg Hospital in Almelo for a year, he was appointed as a pulmonologist/assistant professor in Radboudumc and the Dekkerswald Academic Pulmonology Center in 2001. He served as the Director of Dekkerswald from 2005 to 2010.
Since 2011, he has worked as an associate professor of Clinical Tuberculosis and Mycobacterial Diseases and he has been a Principal Investigator since 2012.

Martin Boeree is the coordinator of the multi-centre PanACEA consortium, where he seeks to make a substantial contribution to the WHO End TB strategy, which is aimed at eliminating tuberculosis by 2035.

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