14 December 2018

The Christine Mohrmann stipendium is awarded yearly to 10 promising female PhD candidates from the different faculties of the Radboud University in Nijmegen.


The goal of the stipendium is to enable junior female scientists to perform research abroad and to encourage them to pursue a scientific career in academia.

Karlien Mul from the department of Neurology, theme Disorders of movement, has been awarded the Christine Mohrmann stipendium of €5000,- in order to visit the National Institute of Health, USA.

Karlien studies Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), an incurable hereditary muscle disease, for which at the moment various therapies are under development that will be tested for efficacy within a few years. In a rare, slowly progressive disease such as FSHD, setting up drug trials is a challenge. Karlien Mul investigates how drug research at FSHD can be set up. She uses the stipend to visit a research group at the National Institutes of Health who have experience with such research.


(Karlien Mul, second person from the right)

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