25 April 2018

In Thorax BMJ journals Anton Schreuder, Bram van Ginneken and colleagues, showed that in a lung cancer screening setting, combining patient characteristics with CT image data can allow many participants to safely skip the first annual follow-up, hereby reducing the number of unnecessary scans.

Background
All lung cancer CT screening trials used fixed follow-up intervals, which may not be optimal. We developed new lung cancer risk models for personalising screening intervals to 1 year or 2 years, and compared these with existing models.
Methods
We included participants in the CT arm of the National Lung Screening Trial (2002–2010) who underwent a baseline scan and a first annual follow-up scan and were not diagnosed with lung cancer in the first year. True and false positives and the area under the curve of each model were calculated. Internal validation was performed using bootstrapping.
Results Data from 24 542 participants were included in the analysis. The accuracy was 0.785, 0.693, 0.697, 0.666 and 0.727 for the polynomial, patient characteristics, diameter, Patz and PanCan models, respectively. Of the 24 542 participants included, 174 (0.71%) were diagnosed with lung cancer between the first and the second annual follow-ups. Using the polynomial model, 2558 (10.4%, 95% CI 10.0% to 10.8%), 7544 (30.7%, 30.2% to 31.3%), 10 947 (44.6%, 44.0% to 45.2%), 16 710 (68.1%, 67.5% to 68.7%) and 20 023 (81.6%, 81.1% to 92.1%) of the 24 368 participants who did not develop lung cancer in the year following the first follow-up screening round could have safely skipped it, at the expense of delayed diagnosis of 0 (0.0%, 0.0% to 2.7%), 8 (4.6%, 2.2% to 9.2%), 17 (9.8%, 6.0% to 15.4%), 44 (25.3%, 19.2% to 32.5%) and 70 (40.2%, 33.0% to 47.9%) of the 174 lung cancers, respectively.
Conclusions
The polynomial model, using both patient characteristics and baseline scan morphology, was significantly superior in assigning participants to 1-year or 2-year screening intervals. Implementing personalised follow-up intervals would enable hundreds of participants to skip a screening round per lung cancer diagnosis delayed.

Aunt Minnie published an interview with Anton.

This research was conducted within the theme of Rare cancers.
 
Publication
Lung cancer risk to personalise annual and biennial follow-up computed tomography screening.
Schreuder A, Schaefer-Prokop CM, Scholten ET, Jacobs C, Prokop M, van Ginneken B.
Thorax. 2018 Mar 30.

Related news items


ADP/ATP carrier inhibitor characteristics identified

3 March 2021

Tom Schirris and colleagues, published an article entitled “Characterization of drug-induced human mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier inhibition” in Theranostics.

read more

Water as a new tool for cardiac screening for chest pain

2 March 2021

Patients with chest pain not caused by a narrowing of the coronary arteries often do not know the cause of their symptoms. Scientists at the Radboudumc have successfully used a new technique to investigate other causes in the coronary arteries of the heart.

read more

Reducing sitting time improves blood flow in the brain and in the legs

2 March 2021

During a regular day, the average person sits for 8-10 hours. These high levels of sitting time seem linked to an increased risk for both cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases.

read more

Real-time dialogue with a dreaming person is possible

25 February 2021

Dreams take us to what feels like a different reality. They also happen while we're fast asleep. So, you might not expect that a person in the midst of a vivid dream would be able to perceive questions and provide answers to them. But a new international study shows that, in fact, they can.

read more

Vulnerable Nijmegen citizens less likely to visit GP physically due to corona

23 February 2021

The COVID-19 pandemic in 2020 in Nijmegen and the surrounding area led to a substantial decrease in GP consultations for patients with chronic physical health problems.

read more

SATB1 - Three classes of mutations and their unique rare diseases

18 February 2021

Recent advances in DNA sequencing technologies have made it possible to uncover the causes of multiple rare diseases. A new collaborative study describes how three classes of mutation within the same gene result in different neurodevelopmental disorders.

read more