En News 2018 Within Sight of my PhD blog by Anique ter Braake

8 February 2018

As PhD candidates we all love science. That is what connects us all. A PhD program is the first step to really pursue a career in science. During these PhD years we get the opportunity to, for the first time, put our best foot forward as an independent researcher.

Although (hopefully) most of the time exciting, we all know that the PhD track can be demanding and challenging. Therefore, feedback from both the side of the supervisor and us as PhD candidates can be valuable.

The course “Within Sight of My PhD” is designed for (MD-)PhD candidates halfway through their PhD track to exchange experiences, together think about goals and competences, and re-set yourself to freshly start the last two years. The course is unique because it creatively allows reflection on the first two years of your PhD not based on results, but merely based on the personal growth – that fruits these results. The course provides a confidential platform to ask questions and discuss challenges that we all encounter. Or, challenges that maybe seem a bit too challenging and for which you can use the help and advice from other PhD candidates. Being versatile and dynamic, the program involves an informal dinner with alumni PhD’s, chats with peers and supervisors and a useful personality test.

For me, the most striking part of the program was that we got the opportunity to train a work-related case with a professional actor. As a scientist the focus is primarily on scientific content. It was amazing how insightful the sessions with the actors were, as these trainings enabled us to practice difficult conversations with colleagues and supervisors. You get to know yourself, and view these situations in a whole new light.

All in all, during “Within Sight of my PhD”, it is recognized and advantageously encouraged that the quality and effectiveness of a scientist greatly relies on communication and inter-personal skills, and that these aspects can help to get the most out of your PhD project.
 
Interested? Join the “Within Sight” course!
For more information please contact the RIMLS PhD Graduate School.





 
 

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