6 December 2019

In a retrospective study of patients with Autoimmune Hepatitis (AIH), Simon Pape and Joost Drenth, theme Renal disorders, and together with researchers of the European Reference Network RARE-LIVER, found that a rapid response to treatment, based on level of AST after 8 weeks, associates with normalization of transaminase levels in the following year. Patients with a rapid response also have a lower risk of liver-related death or transplantation than patients without this rapid response. They have published their results in 
Clinial Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Changes in serum levels of transaminases immediately after initiation of treatment for autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) might be associated with biochemical markers of remission and liver-related events. They assessed the outcomes of patients with vs without rapid responses to treatment of AIH in a large international cohort.

A significant decrease in level of AST after 8 weeks of treatment was significantly associated with normalization of transaminase levels at 26 and 52 weeks (P<.001); a decrease of more than 80% in level of AST was associated with optimal normalization. In both cohorts, rapid responders (≥80% decrease in level of AST after 8 weeks) were more likely to achieve normalization of transaminases at 26 and 52 weeks when compared to non-rapid responders. Rapid responders in the discovery cohort had lower risk of liver-related death or transplantation (adjusted hazard ratio 0.18; 95% CI 0.05–0.63; P=.007), although this was not confirmed in the validation cohort. Results from measurement of alanine aminotransferase did not differ significantly from those of AST for the primary outcome. Slow responders (without normalization of transaminases after 1 year) had the highest risk of liver transplantation or liver-related death. Levels of aminotransferases should be monitored immediate after patients with AIH begin treatment with steroids to identify those likely to respond.
 

Related news items


Biomarkers found in COVID-19 patients support bradykinin hypothesis

29 May 2020

A study into inflammatory substances in the blood of COVID-19 patients supports the hypothesis that kinins could play a role in the respiratory problems experienced by critically ill COVID-19 patients in IC. This discovery, published at MedRxiv, could lead to the development of new treatments.

read more

Introducing OnePlanet Research Center webinar 5 June, 16:00 hrs.

29 May 2020

OnePlanet Research Center develops digital technologies to create a society in which everyone can live a healthy life and has access to healthy and sustainable food. Radboudumc and Radboud University are amongst the founding partners. Find out what OnePlanet can do for you in this online session.

read more

The impact of sex and gender in the COVID-19 pandemic

29 May 2020

The case study of Sabine Oertelt-Prigione, developed by the European Commission’s H2020 Expert Group to update and expand "Gendered Innovations/Innovation through Gender", examines the impact of sex and gender in the current COVID-19 pandemic.

read more

Terrestrial bacteria can grow on nutrients from space

26 May 2020

Researchers from the Radboudumc describe in an article in Astrobiology that bacteria can survive on an 'extraterrestrial diet', which affected their pathogenic potential.

read more

The new front line: big data podcast

22 May 2020

What role do big data and technology play in the fight against corona? What data can help save lives? How do you ensure that your personal health data is used safely? Among others, Peter-Bram 't Hoen explains.

read more

OARSI Basic Science Award for Peter van der Kraan

22 May 2020

Purpose of this Basic Science Award of the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) is to stimulate fundamental research in the field of osteoarthritis. Congratulations Peter.

read more