28 January 2020

In Annals of Oncology, the TIRED trial study group including former RIHS PhD candidate Hanneke Poort, Marlies PetersWinette van der Graaf, Ria Nijhuis-van der Sanden and colleagues described the results of a RCT assessing the effects of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) or graded exercise therapy (GET) on fatigue in patients with advanced cancer during treatment with palliative intent in nine centers in The Netherlands.
 
Adult patients  (n=134, 57 % female) with locally advanced or metastatic cancer who reported severe fatigue during treatment were randomly assigned to either 12 weeks of CBT or GET, or usual care (1 : 1: 1, computer-generated sequence). Primary outcome was CIS-fatigue severity at 14 weeks. Secondary outcomes included fatigue measured with the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer-Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC-QLQ-C30), quality of life, emotional functioning, physical functioning, and functional impairments at baseline, 14, 18, and 26 weeks. A total of 126 participants completed assessment at 14 weeks. Compared with usual care, CBT significantly reduced fatigue, whereas GET reduced fatigue, however effects were not significant compared with usual care. Moreover CBT improved also the secondary outcomes, while GET did not. No significant improvements in emotional functioning and functional impairments were observed. The TIRED trial study team concluded that a CBT intervention was more effective than usual care for reducing severe fatigue. Following GET, patients reported lower fatigue, but results were not significant, probably due to a smaller sample size and lower adherence than anticipated.

Publication
Cognitive behavioral therapy or graded exercise therapy compared with usual care for severe fatigue in patients with advanced cancer during treatment: a randomized controlled trial.
Poort H, Peters MEWJ, van der Graaf WTA, Nieuwkerk PT, van de Wouw AJ, Nijhuis-van der Sanden MWG, Bleijenberg G, Verhagen CAHHVM, Knoop H.

 
 

Related news items


Sensitive blood-test as patient-friendly alternative for bone marrow-based cancer monitoring

20 October 2021

Hans Jacobs and Pieter Langerhorst, theme Cancer development and immune defense, and colleagues are one step closer to implementation of personalized diagnostics for bone marrow-based cancer monitoring.

read more

Register for peer coaching for RIMLS PhD candidates

20 October 2021

As a PhD candidate, you are in the lead of your own learning process. But you don’t need to do this alone: Register for the peer-coaching group ‘Stay in the lead – Together’ before 11 November 2021.

read more

Frans Russel appointed member Supervisory Committee of RIVM

20 October 2021

Frans Russel, theme Renal disorders, has been appointed by The Minister of Health, Welfare and Sport (VWS).

read more

Often additional demand for care without decreasing number of admissions Telemonitoring in chronic heart failure not unqualifiedly positive

19 October 2021

To contain rising healthcare costs, digitization of healthcare is often seen as a solution. Researchers at the Radboudumc examined the use of telemonitoring in chronic heart failure. Does this reduce hospital admissions and visits to the emergency room?

read more

RIMLS awards call for nominations

19 October 2021

RIMLS awards several prizes to stimulate and honor our (young) researchers. Please find here an overview of the upcoming awards. Deadline 24 November 2021.

read more

Epigenetics: Immunization is passed on to offspring Mice transmit adaptations to infections to next generations

19 October 2021

Does an infection affect the immunization of subsequent generations? It does, according to research now published in Nature Immunology.

read more