30 July 2020

With a 650,000 euro funding from ZonMw, researchers from the Haematology and Pharmacy departments can develop a medication phasing out strategy for patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia. This strategy will be tested in practice.

Chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) is a serious and rare disease. With new, expensive drugs (tyrosine kinase inhibitors), patients can be treated relatively easily and survival is good. However, the majority of patients (for the time being) have to take these drugs for life. This is a major burden because half of the patients experience moderate to severe side effects, which reduce the quality of life. 

Reduce side effects & reduce costs
There are indications that the dose of the medication can be safely reduced if the disease is stable. The lower dose reduces the chance and severity of side effects and improves the quality of life. In addition, dose reduction also means that patients need to take less medication. This reduces the cost of treatment (approximately €13,000-€70,000 per patient per year). 

Patient-driven phase-out strategy
Under the leadership of Professor Nicole Blijlevens (Hematology) and researcher Charlotte Bekker (Pharmacy), the Department of Haematology and Pharmacy will develop and test a phasing out strategy in CML patients with whom the disease remains stable. Reduction means that the dose of medication will be lowered. The control and decision to reduce the dose is the patient's responsibility, and is therefore patient-driven. By giving the patient (in the home situation) his own direction, the researchers hope to motivate him/her to improve the lifelong use of medication. The disease remains stable, side effects diminish, the quality of life improves at lower drug costs.

The funding falls under the ZonMw programme Good Usage of Medicines.

Related news items


BRAINMODEL: precision medicine for brain disorders

25 October 2021

A team of researchers from Radboudumc, VU Amsterdam and other institutes is going to look for new and better ways to heal developmental disorders in the brain.

read more

How healthy is James Bond? - A flu to a kill No time to die: the pathogens surrounding secret agent 007

21 October 2021

James Bond made a total of 25 films between 1962 and 2021. In all those films, secret agent 007 washed his hands only twice, even though he often stayed in not so hygienic places with considerable health risks. Radboudumc researchers examined all the health risks in the 47 countries Bond visited.

read more

Surprisingly dominant cause underlying type I congenital defect of glycosylation

21 October 2021

Alex Garanto, Melissa Bärenfänger, Mirian Janssen, and Dirk Lefeber published a new study, identifying a surprisingly dominant genetic cause underlying type I congenital defect of glycosylation with neuromusculoskeletal phenotypes.

read more

Sensitive blood-test as a patient-friendly alternative for bone marrow-based cancer monitoring

20 October 2021

Hans Jacobs and Pieter Langerhorst, theme Cancer development and immune defense, and colleagues are one step closer to implementation of personalized diagnostics for bone marrow-based cancer monitoring.

read more

Register for peer coaching for RIMLS PhD candidates

20 October 2021

As a PhD candidate, you are in the lead of your own learning process, but you don’t need to do this alone. Register for the peer-coaching group ‘Stay in the lead – Together’ before 11 November 2021.

read more