Research Themes Nanomedicine

Nanomedicine About theme

The mission of this theme is to design and synthesize molecular assemblies, in order to understand and manipulate cellular functions and generate precise solutions for intricate medical challenges in diagnosis and therapy of diseases.

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Nanomedicine About theme

The mission of this theme is to design and synthesize molecular assemblies, in order to understand and manipulate cellular functions and generate precise solutions for intricate medical challenges in diagnosis and therapy of diseases. Key challenges addressed are: understanding structure and function of molecules and molecular assemblies, and designing biomimetic systems.

Nanomedicine is a rapidly developing area of research that aims to create nanoscale functional units to manipulate cellular processes for use in research, biomedicine, and diagnostics. The theme Nanomedicine forms a multidisciplinary research platform firmly based on expertise in (bio)organic and physical organic chemistry, biochemistry, cell biology, supramolecular chemistry, systems chemistry, microfluidics, microscopy, PET/SPECT imaging, single cell technologies, and bioinformatics. The theme concentrates on two lines of research: cellular and extracellular nano-organizations, and precision diagnostics and therapies. Theme members aim to generate and analyze nano- and microstructures for the understanding, and manipulation of cells in biomedicine.

Objectives

  • We aim to develop molecular probes and bio-orthogonal chemistry to label biomolecules in living cells with minimal invasiveness and optimal selectivity. Using state-of-the-art imaging methodologies, we study the fate of biomolecules in living cells and organisms.
  • We study protein signaling pathways at the molecular level in living cells.
  • We study mechanisms and approaches for cellular drug delivery.
  • We will investigate the dynamic interactions of cells with their environment/extracellular matrix.
  • We will identify and characterize molecular markers for disease associated dysfunctional biological processes and develop methods for their detection.
  • We will develop microfluidics platforms to study single-cell behavior in detail.
  • We aim to develop bio- and chemo-informatics tools to analyze big data generated by omics platforms more effectively.
  • We will develop targeted nanosized carrier systems for cargo transport, delivery and immune regulation.
  • We seek to bring chemists, biologists and medical doctors together to create an open research environment in which medical challenges are translated into nanomedicine solutions.

Theme leader

Daniela Wilson PhD
full professor

+31 (0)24 365 21 85

Contact

Lines of research


Cellular and extracellular nano-organizations

Understanding the complexity of living cells and in particular those processes that cause disease, requires a detailed molecular insight in the biological processes that govern cellular behavior.

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Cellular and extracellular nano-organizations

Understanding the complexity of living cells and in particular those processes that cause disease, requires a detailed molecular insight in the biological processes that govern cellular behavior. This includes the detailed study of molecular interactions, both inter- and intracellularly, with molecular probes that minimally affect the processes to be analyzed. Quantitative bioimaging approaches are excellent tools to help us understand fundamental cell function at the nanoscale based on dynamic protein-protein interactions. Developments proceed at an impressive pace in the microscopy field, involving superior optics, better detectors, improved image analysis tools as well as new and more versatile fluorophores. The award of the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry to the scientists who pioneered super-resolution microscopy is a clear indication of the broad impact that microscopy has on life sciences. Several investigators of the theme exploit advanced quantitative bioimaging techniques, such as super-resolution microscopes, that are readily available on campus and allow innovative research of nanoscale cellular processes mediating health and disease. Information on cellular nano-organization is crucial to foster the design of optimal nanomedicine tools to target specific cellular functions, thus providing an excellent link to the second major research topic.
 

Precision diagnostics and therapies

Understanding the complex structure-function relationships of cellular molecular processes ultimately leads to radical new nanomedicine approaches to amend biological processes that have become dysfunctional, and as such to develop precision medicines and therapies.

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Precision diagnostics and therapies

Understanding the complex structure-function relationships of cellular molecular processes ultimately leads to radical new nanomedicine approaches to amend biological processes that have become dysfunctional, and as such to develop precision medicines and therapies. Such approaches can only become successful via close collaboration between researchers in chemistry, biology, and biomedicine, who have affinity for the molecular life sciences. Research into innovative diagnostic concepts and novel therapeutic approaches is one of the core areas within the nanomedicine theme. The theme has a strong expertise in bio-organic chemistry and bio-nanotechnology. A variety of groups utilizes novel click chemistry approaches to combine molecular recognition of (tumor-specific) cell-surface receptors via peptides, antibody-like structures or alternative scaffolds with a number of diagnostic functionalities. For instance, PET and SPECT tracers, or therapeutic functionalities, including small-molecule and intracellular drugs are being developed. Besides tumor targeting, work on other diseases include the targeted delivery of nucleic acids in chronic kidney disease or novel treatments to fight diseases that arise from misfolded proteins or protein aggregates. Next to the use of state-of-the-art animal models, there is now an increasing focus on the use of advanced (e.g. microfluidic) 3D culture model systems. Additionally, the development of novel molecular assemblies and/or functionalized nanoparticles, serving either as drug delivery vehicles or theranostics, is leading to radical new approaches in targeted drug delivery and cancer immunotherapy. Specific examples include the use of functionalized nanoparticles that facilitate the use of novel imaging modalities for the in vivo tracking of immune cells, or that educate the immune system on how to more efficiently eradicate tumors. Furthermore, we investigate self-assembled locomotive nanoparticles (catalytic nanomotors, nanorobots, etc.) that exhibit directional and autonomous movement towards signaling molecules provided by tumors and other diseased tissues. This is a prime example of research enabling radical new concepts in active delivery and the next generation of drug delivery systems with more advanced properties.
 

News and agenda

Organisation


Researchers Nanomedicine

See the researchers related to this theme.

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Answers in Dutch

Information on our research can also be found in Dutch on the Nationale Wetenschapsagenda website. The information here answers questions asked by Dutch citizens. go to Nationale Wetenschapsagenda

Research group leaders

Affiliated institutes and centers

Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences

Our main aim is to achieve a greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms of disease. By integrating fundamental and clinical research, we obtain multifaceted knowledge of (patho)physiological processes. read more

Radboudumc Technology Center Flow cytometry

At the Radboudumc extensive experience in flow cytometry is used in basic and translational research as well as clinical practice and clinical trials. We offer scientists advice and access to flow cytometry analyzers and sorters.

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Radboudumc Technology Center Animal research facility

This technology center offers advice and support from planning up to and including the conduct of animal research on behalf of biomedical research and education.

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