17 January 2018

Marianne Oldehinkel received Rubicon Grant from the Dutch Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). The Rubicon programme gives young, highly promising researchers the opportunity to gain international research experience.

Disrupted communication in the autistic brain

The abnormal processing of sensory information, such as hypersensitivity to noise, is a frequently occurring but neglected symptom of autism. Using brain scans, Marianne Oldehinkel will investigate abnormalities in sensory brain networks to find the underlying cause of this problem. She will perfom her studies at the Brain & Mental Health Lab of the Monash Institute of Cognitive and Clinical Neurosciences (Australia).



> Go the RU website for the complete list of Rubicon awardees

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