20 February 2020

Christian Beckmann, Sander Leeuwenburgh and Annette Schenck each receive an 1.5 million euro Vici research grant from the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). The recipients will use the money to conduct research over the next five years and build up their own research group. The Vici grant is one of the largest personal scientific grants of the Netherlands. This year, the NWO awarded 32 Vici grants in total (seven Vici grants for Radboud University medical center and University). 

Christian Beckmann, DCMN, theme Stress-related disorders. 
Big data for precision medicine: new tools for brain connectopics.
Christian Beckmann is appointed as professor Statistical Imaging Neuroscience. His research focus is on developing novel methods for imaging neurosciences.  Over the last two decades neuroimaging has made significant contributions to our understanding of human brain function. The indirect nature of the data requires sophisticated modeling and analysis approaches in order to infer interpretable quantities of interest.
The researcher will develop techniques that allow researchers to better understand human brain processes and compare individual patients to ‘normal’ ranges of cognitive functioning. These techniques will be tested in a large Dutch sample of early Parkinson’s Disease patients to better understand the underlying neurobiology of the disorder.

Sander Leeuwenburgh, RIMLS, theme Reconstructive and regenerative medicine.
Regeneration of diseased bone by biomaterials built from nanoparticles.

Sander Leeuwenburgh is professor Regenerative Biomaterials. His research group is developing injectable and self-healing biomaterials which stimulate the regenerative capacity of the human body. 
Currently available biomaterials are not able to heal defects in diseased bone effectively. In this project novel self-porous and healing biomaterials will be self-assembled from nanoparticles to release antibacterial and anticancer drugs directly into cells. These new properties will accelerate bone regeneration and combat bone diseases effectively.

Annette Schenck: DCMN, theme Neurodevelopmental disorders. 
Towards treatment of Intellectual Disability and Autism disorders.

Annette Schenck is Associate Professor in Translational Genomics of Neurodevelopmental Disorders. Her research focuses on dissecting molecular networks and mechanisms underlying human brain function and disease. In order to be able to investigate the large number of genes, we use a powerful genetic model organism, the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster.
Intellectual disability and autism are frequent and currently untreatable disorders. This project will use an ancient, highly conserved form of learning and the fruit fly as a model to investigate the neurobiology of these disorders and develop effective translational treatment strategies for subgroups of patients.



 

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