Hypatia Tenure Track Grant for external candidates


Funding to stimulate talents

This grant aims to promote innovation in academic research by giving young, creative and talented researchers the opportunity to further their own research within the context of our three research institutes. These positions offer a special opportunity to establish an independent research group.

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Funding to stimulate talents

The Radboudumc Hypatia Tenure Track Grants aim to promote innovation in academic research by giving young, creative and talented researchers the opportunity to further their own research within the context of our three research institutes. These unique and highly sought after research positions offer a special opportunity to establish an independent research group. By obtaining a Hypatia Tenure Track Grant, candidates will also be offered the possibility to take part in the Hypatia Track, a talent program for excellent researchers who are ready to develop themselves as leaders within their academic fields. After the term of the fellowship and subject to the candidate fulfilling our Principal Investigator criteria, the candidate will be offered a  permanent contract.

With the Hypatia Tenure Track Grants we intend to recruit talent from outside Radboudumc. In this respect  candidates should not have had an employment relationship with Radboud University or Radboudumc in the last 3 years.

Contact

Dagmar Eleveld-Trancikova PhD
+31 (0)6 11 707 830

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On offer

What can Radboudumc offer excellent researchers?

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On offer

With the Hypatia Tenure Track Grant, Radboudumc can offer you the following: 
  • An independent researcher position with a salary conform the collective appointment agreement of the Dutch University Medical Centers.
  • Excellent prospects for tenure track (i.e. faculty position with permanent contract).
  • An internationally recognized competitive research environment with ample opportunities for interdisciplinary collaboration and participation in
  • A 4-year contract.
  • Financial rewards for meeting excellent research criteria.

Candidate criteria

What kind of researchers can apply for a grant?

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Candidate criteria

We are looking for creative and talented (clinical) researchers who have:
  • A background in computational science, neuroscience, (molecule) life sciences, health sciences or public health research.
  • High affinity for applied research in on of the Radboudumc research themes.
  • Excellent researchers (guideline 3-8 years after PhD graduation) with a strong motivation to perform top internationally-recognized research. Extension of the 8 years is possible based on the NWO extension rule (question 25).
  • A proven track record in funding and publications. Candidates should haven either:
    (i) acquired an NWO Vidi, ERC Starting/Consolidator grant or other prestigious personal funding
    or
    (ii) should be judged by the Hypatia Committee to be able to do so within the term of the Hypatia track.
  • Candidates must have demonstrated their success in high impact publication as first or senior author. Preferentially, candidates have international experience.
  • Excellent interpersonal and communication skills with the strong wish to work interdisciplinary.
  • Good leadership skills with an ability to inspire young researchers.

Five questions for Teun Bousema Awarded the Hypatia Tenure Track Grant

“Some places like to encourage internal competition in the belief that it makes people more productive. Radboudumc actively encourages research collaborations.”

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Five questions for Teun Bousema Awarded the Hypatia Tenure Track Grant

When Teun Bousema first became interested in the transmission of malaria from humans to mosquitoes 16 years ago, the subject was something of a niche area. Since then it has taken centre stage thanks to renewed hopes of eradicating the disease. After breaking new ground early in his career at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Bousema was awarded the Hypatia Tenure Track Grant and moved to Radboudumc.

Q1 How did you come to study malaria and its transmission from humans to mosquitoes?

My interest began quite coincidentally. In 2000, when I was 22, I took a gap year. I’d completed my Master’s in Biomedical Sciences and wasn’t attracted to the PhD opportunities I’d been offered. While I was in Ghana helping to establish a research centre and a clinic, I ran out of books and picked up a copy of Essential Malariology in a dusty book store in Accra. It explains how P. falciparum, the parasite that causes the deadliest form of malaria, thrives in completely diff erent forms in varying hosts. I was fascinated by the interaction between the parasite, mosquito and human.

Q2 Could you describe some of your research?

I’m interested in the right time to intervene to prevent the spread of disease. You might assume that if someone receives treatment for malaria they stop spreading infection, but in some cases people continue to infect mosquitoes for a week or longer, depending on the medication.

My early work showed that standard artemisinin-based combination therapy only has a moderate effect on malaria transmission. I went on to look at the eff ects of other drugs on transmission, and then mosquitocidal drugs that make human blood toxic to malaria mosquitoes. I’ve also been working on the possibility to target transmission hotspots, such as households that are at greater risk because of immunological factors, distance to water or human genetics, to prevent the spread of malaria more effectively.

Q3 What attracted you to Radboudumc?

The extensive lab facilities were a big attraction. We have a unique automated parasite culturing system and routinely culture more than 10,000 female mosquitoes per week. We use a number of parasite strains from across the globe to generate infected mosquitoes and use them to infect volunteers to help us understand transmission dynamics.

It was also about the research environment here. Some places like to encourage internal competition in the belief that it makes people more productive. It is one of the elements of academic life that I find very unattractive. Radboudumc actively encourages research collaborations between departments, and we’re at the forefront of eff orts to fi nd new ways to judge scientific excellence. It’s still important to publish in good journals and be visible, but there’s also a strong emphasis on having a positive impact on healthcare and society, and on interdisciplinary collaboration. Th e other big attraction was the Hypatia Track.

Q4 What does the Hypatia Tenure Track Grant offer and how has it helped your professional development?

It provides four years of salary and support for talented researchers who want to set up their own research group. It’s fantastic to have the time and flexibility to show what you are worth without having to constantly worry about applying for grants. It has allowed me to focus onmy lab– and fieldwork and to travel extensively in Africa to explore new research areas and collaborations.
At least as important as the financial side is the investment in personal development. Hypatia includes 18 months of training in skills such as leadership, negotiation and media training. We have mentors and form peer groups at the same stage of academic development — we meet for training and to share common problems.
 
While an individual’s specific research interests are important, Hypatia is more about an investment in talent. To those they select, Radboudumc is saying, “we like your work, we want you to continue to work here and we trust you to use these funds in the best way possible.” That in itself is a good feeling. Beyond that, it has helped me to think about my research with a long-term perspective. Hypatia has helped me extend my group’s network and has increased my visibility, both within Radboudumc and worldwide as a relevant malaria researcher.

Q5 What inspires you about your work?

The interplay between parasite, mosquito and human is an intriguing intellectual challenge. Having a significant impact on healthcare is the slogan of Radboudumc, but it is also something that motivates me personally. If malaria wasn’t an important public health problem I’d move to another field. I’m also attracted by the adventure of travelling and living in Africa. I was fascinated by the interaction between the parasite, mosquito and human.


Application procedure

What stages does the application procedure entail?

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Application procedure

Every year, there are three grants available. The procedure consists of two stages:
  1. CV and Proposal outline: Candidates must submit their CV, which includes past research performance and research proposal outline. Research proposals should fall within the research profile of one of the three affiliated research institutes.
    Within 4 weeks after the submission deadline, candidates will be informed if they go to stage 2.
  2. Full proposal, seminar and interview: Candidates will then be requested to submit a full research propels that will be sent to external referees. Thereafter they will be invited to give a seminar and will be interviewed by group leaders.
    A decision will be made on the basis of the seminar, interviews with group leaders and peer-reviewed research proposal.

Deadlines application for 2017

Applications will be evaluated three times a year by the Radboudumc Talent Board. The application deadlines are:

  • Sunday 29 Jan. 2017, 23:59
  • Sunday 28 May 2017, 23:59
  • Sunday 24 Sept. 2017, 23:59

Application form

Download the application form and send all necessary information to Dagmar Eleveld-Trancikovawith, with subject 'Application for Hypatia Track grant'.

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Frequently Asked Questions about the Hypatia Tenure Track grants

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  • On average successful applications, from submission to final decision, take 6 months. Within 2-3 weeks after the first round submission deadline, you will be informed of the committee’s decision for a second round invitation.

Experience of the participants

Want to find out what our talent programs are all about from people who have experienced it? The following people do not mind you contacting them.

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