21 August 2018

Peter Friedl, theme Cancer development and immunce defense, and colleagues of The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, have engineered a system allowing microscopic monitoring and imaging of cancer that has spread to the bone in mice so they can better understand and develop treatment for bone metastasis in humans.

The researchers show how the technique can monitor and capture the dynamics of tumor cell interaction with bone and bone resident cells as they occur over time.

  • A tissue-engineered construct under a mouse’s skin develops in about a month into bone with an internal cavity and a thin outer layer that the microscope can “see” through.
  • After bone marrow and other cells populate the cavity, a cancer cell line is injected.
  • Interactions between malignant cells and bone cells are viewed through the multiphoton microscope via a small glass window sewn into the skin above the bone.
They published their findings in Science Translational Medicine: link. 

Multiphoton microscopy is a fluorescent imaging technique used to image living tissue. The microscopes in the lab of Peter Friedl, can capture up to seven parameters at a time. Friedl is senior author of the study. 

The bone construct was developed by a team of scientists at the Centre in Regenerative Medicine, Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, in Brisbane, Australia, led by Dietmar Hutmacher, Ph.D. Normal bone biology involves a balance between bone-creating cells called osteoblasts, and bone-destroying cells called osteoclasts, Eleonora Dondossola, the first author of the article and senior team member in peter Friedl's laboratory at MD Anderson Cancer Center,  notes. Cancer tips this balance, altering the equilibrium between these two populations and leading to symptomatic bone remodeling. The team’s microscopy showed bone loss concentrated around osteoclasts near the tumor. This phenomenon is a known and painful issue for patients with prostate cancer bone metastasis, and a class of drugs called bisphosphonates is used to relieve this symptom. In the clinic, the effect is known to be palliative, relieving pain but not prolonging survival. The team’s multiphoton microscopy captured this effect. They treated the mice with the bisphosphonate zoledronic acid and found that the drug did not reduce the number of osteoclasts, but slowed their activity, preserving bone. Notably, the treatment had no effect on tumor growth, and this explains why the bone is stabilized but patient survival is not prolonged.

Friedl’s lab is using this model to study cancer treatments in mice, including co-clinical work in immunotherapy and radiation. Drugs that free the immune system to attack cancer are often thwarted by resistance factors in the tumor microenvironment, which the team hopes to observe and characterize.

Related news items


Hans van Bokhoven newly elected in Academia Europaea

22 August 2019

The Academia Europaea is a functioning European Academy of Humanities, Letters and Sciences, composed of individual members.

read more

Drug-induced interstitial lung disease in advanced breast cancer patients receiving everolimus

22 August 2019

In Targeted Oncology, Annelieke Willemsen, Carla van Herpen and colleagues, showed that pulmonary function test with diffusion capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide and serum biomarkers can be of aid to differentiate everolimus-related interstitial lung disease from other respiratory problems.

read more

Publication in PNAS on dissecting EEC syndrome using single-cell RNA-seq

22 August 2019

PhD candidates Eduardo Soares and Quan Xu in Jo Huiqing Zhou’s group in Molecular Developmental Biology, theme Reconstruction and regenerative medicine, have published a paper in PNAS on the disease mechanism of EEC syndrome using single-cell RNA-seq technology and patient-derived iPSCs.

read more

Patient trust and participation in cell biological research

21 August 2019

Alessandra Cambi and Gert Olthuis, discuss key ethical issues inherent in the development and the value of building trust and trustworthiness.

read more

NWO grant for a tissue-generating patch to close diaphragmatic defects

21 August 2019

Willeke Daamen and Toin van Kuppevelt, theme Reconstructive and regenerative medicine, were recently awarded a 690 k€ grant by NWO, domain Applied & Engineering Sciences, for the development of advanced patches for closure of diaphragmatic defects in children with congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

read more

Front cover Human Mutation

21 August 2019

The MetaDome web server build to interpret genetic variants based on genetic tolerance and homologous protein domains is featured on the Cover of Human Mutation. MetaDome was developed by Laurens van de Wiel, Coos Baakman, Daan Gilissen, Joris Veltman, Gert Vriend and Christian Gilissen,

read more