24 May 2019

Three researchers from RIMLS are each to receive up to 800,000 euros to develop an innovative research theme and to build up their own research group. NWO (The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research) is awarding the Vidi grant as part of the Innovational Research Incentives Scheme.

Vidi is aimed at excellent researchers who have been producing successful research for a number of years since obtaining their PhD. These academics are among the best 10 to 20 percent in their field. A Vidi will allow them to conduct research for a period of five years. In this way, NWO stimulates curiosity-driven and innovative research.

We congratulate our researchers with this funding and wish them a lot of success with their great work.


Matthijs Jore, Dept. of Medical Microbiology, theme Infectious diseases and global health

Project: The malaria parasite’s fight against our immune system
Malaria is caused by unicellular parasites that are transmitted by mosquitoes. This research project studies at a molecular level how malaria parasites can evade the human immune system. The obtained insight will be used to develop novel drugs and vaccines against malaria.


Daniele Tauriello, Dept. of Cell Biology, theme Tumors of the digestive tract
Project: Restoring the immune system to prevent cancer from spreading
White blood cells can kill spreading cancer cells but are frequently sidelined by the tumour. The researchers will dissect this process of immune evasion in cultured minitumours to then block it in colon cancer in mice. With this treatment option, they may be able to prevent or cure metastasis.


Johannes Textor, Dept. of Tumor Immunology, theme Cancer development and immune defense
Project: How Intelligent is the Immune System?
Like our brain, our immune system can learn. The researchers will build computer models of the immune system and train these to recognize text and images to understand how the system learns, forgets, and gets confused. This will help to design therapies that use the immune system, such as vaccines.

 

Related news items


Largest study ever on research integrity Aimed at all researchers in the Netherlands

15 October 2020

Radboudumc participates in the National Survey on Research Integrity (NSRI), which is being distributed to nearly 40,000 researchers in the Netherlands starting today. The survey seeks to sketch a picture of the issues that can foster or hinder research integrity. Please fill out the survey!

read more

Exoskeleton home and community use in people with complete spinal cord injury

15 October 2020

Radboudumc researchers are first to study actual exoskeleton use in the home and community environment in people with motor complete spinal cord injury.

read more

Making bones is less difficult than was previously thought Ten-year controversy settled with publication in Nature Communications

15 October 2020

The way in which bone formation occurs need to be redefined. This was revealed in a publication in Nature Communications by Nico Sommerdijk, theme Reconstructive and Regenerative Medicine, and his colleagues.

read more

28 New genes identified as cause of severe developmental disorders

14 October 2020

Christian Gilissen with GeneDx and the Wellcome Sanger Institute, have published a major study in the scientific journal Nature, showing the need to bring data together. 

read more

TURBO grants for four medical-technical research projects

8 October 2020

On Wednesday, October 7th, four TURBO grants were awarded to new technical-medical research proposals. The grants are part of the TURBO program, a collaboration between the University of Twente (TechMed Centre) and the Radboudumc.

read more

New genetic cause for vision impairment and blindness discovered

8 October 2020

After thirty years of research, the genetic defect that causes the eye disease retinitis pigmentosa type 17 (RP17) has finally been discovered.

read more