1 June 2018

Three RIMLS researchers received each 800,000 euros to develop an innovative research project and to build up their own research group. NWO (The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research) is awarding the Vidi grant as part of the Innovational Research Incentives Scheme.

Vidi is aimed at excellent researchers who have been producing successful research for a number of years since obtaining their PhD. These academics are among the best 10 to 20 percent in their field. A Vidi will allow them to conduct research for a period of five years. In this way, NWO stimulates curiosity-driven and innovative research.

Information about the RIMLS scientists and their research is given below.

How to read the genome

Simon van Heeringen (FNWI), theme Cancer development and immune defense.
A fertilized egg cell develops into a complete organism with many different cell types. How is this encoded in the genome? Biologists will compare the development of different animals. Using ‘big data’ they will train computer algorithms to understand cellular decisions. This knowledge will be essential for regenerative medicine.

Why do healthy people die of the flu?

Frank van de Veerdonk, theme Infectious diseases and global health
A pandemic is inevitable and will cost millions of lives including many healthy adults. Deadly complications of the flu are fungal infection or a life-threatening inflammatory response. This research will identify why these complications happen and can lead to treatment that can save lives during a severe flu season.

A microchip-based toolbox to treat osteoporosis

Alireza Dolatshahi-Pirouz, theme Reconstructive and regenerative medicine
Due to the aging population new innovations are needed for dealing with osteoporosis the most common disability among today’s elderly. Regenerative medicine can address this challenge through hydrogel- based stem cell therapies. The goal is to develop a toolbox for testing thousands of such therapies in a single experiment.
 

Related news items


Biomarkers found in COVID-19 patients support bradykinin hypothesis

29 May 2020

A study into inflammatory substances in the blood of COVID-19 patients supports the hypothesis that kinins could play a role in the respiratory problems experienced by critically ill COVID-19 patients in IC. This discovery, published at MedRxiv, could lead to the development of new treatments.

read more

Introducing OnePlanet Research Center webinar 5 June, 16:00 hrs.

29 May 2020

OnePlanet Research Center develops digital technologies to create a society in which everyone can live a healthy life and has access to healthy and sustainable food. Radboudumc and Radboud University are amongst the founding partners. Find out what OnePlanet can do for you in this online session.

read more

Terrestrial bacteria can grow on nutrients from space

26 May 2020

Researchers from the Radboudumc describe in an article in Astrobiology that bacteria can survive on an 'extraterrestrial diet', which affected their pathogenic potential.

read more

The new front line: big data podcast

22 May 2020

What role do big data and technology play in the fight against corona? What data can help save lives? How do you ensure that your personal health data is used safely? Among others, Peter-Bram 't Hoen explains.

read more

OARSI Basic Science Award for Peter van der Kraan

22 May 2020

Purpose of this Basic Science Award of the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) is to stimulate fundamental research in the field of osteoarthritis. Congratulations Peter.

read more

First clinical trial with genetically modified malaria vaccine completed

22 May 2020

In an innovative study, Radboudumc and LUMC jointly tested a candidate vaccine based on a genetically weakened malaria parasite. The results of this clinical trial, published in Science Translational Medicine, show that the vaccine is safe and elicits a defense response against a malaria infection.

read more